Marmalade: three short NZ plays

Reviewed by: Waikato Times

Date: 26th June, 2008

Reviewer: Rebecca Harper
 

Marmalade lived up to its name. Sweet in places, sticky in others and leaving a slightly sour tase in the mouth, the three short plays dealt with some of the harsher realities of love.

The first of the trio Do You Speak English? was a  charming look at the understandings and misunderstandings of Mark (Scot Hall) and Gina (Antonia Lema Trevino), who do not speak the same language. The pair had a convincing spark and Trevino’s dance background was put to good use.

The second play was one-woman show Banging Cymbal, Clanging Gong.

The enthusiastic performance by Arianne Zilberberg easily held the audience.

This play was a slightly humorous but ultimately sad look at loving and losing.

But it was the third play that really touched me, and I left the theatre feeling slightly disturbed by The Joss Adams Show.

The play was a look at postnatal depression and its sometimes devastating effects, while still managing to live up to its billing as a dark comedy.

I was particularly impressed by the performance of Keagan Fransch, who played Joss, and conveyed a range of emotions in the suffering new mother seamlessly.

The Carving in Ice theatre company delivered a polished performance that left me wanting just a bit more. 

 

ABOUT US

The metaphor of Carving in Ice evokes the transience of theatre. Ice sculptures are crafted by artisans whose sculptures last only for a short while, then melt and disappear. Theatre too is ephemeral in its nature; once the season is completed, the existence of the play, the shapes, sounds, movement in space, the light on actors’ skin disappear from view – but as with ice sculptures the traces of the experience continue to live on in the minds of those who were present.

CONTACT US

Email:
info@carvinginice.co.nz
director@carvinginice.co.nz
publicity@carvinginice.co.nz

 

 

ABOUT US

The metaphor of Carving in Ice evokes the transience of theatre. Ice sculptures are crafted by artisans whose sculptures last only for a short while, then melt and disappear. Theatre too is ephemeral in its nature; once the season is completed, the existence of the play, the shapes, sounds, movement in space, the light on actors’ skin disappear from view – but as with ice sculptures the traces of the experience continue to live on in the minds of those who were present.

CONTACT US

Email:
info@carvinginice.co.nz
director@carvinginice.co.nz
director@carvinginice.co.nz