Reviews & Articles


Latest Reviews - Rabbit Hole

 

Reviewed by: Waikato Times

Date: 6th November, 2012

Reviewer: Aimie Cronin


GREAT INSIGHT INTO EMOTION
 
There’s a grim kind of voyeuristic delight in watching other people struggle. When we suffer, most of us take it home and offload it onto the people we love the most. The public doesn’t get to witness these intimate, messy scenes, and if we do it’s because we’re watching something we probably shouldn’t be.

When the lights came up on the latest Carving in Ice production, Rabbit Hole, the audience got to watch a family struggle with their grief and it was utterly riveting. In part because of outstanding writing by David Lindsay-Abaire (it’s a Pulitzer Prize-winning play), and also director Gaye Poole’s sensitive and delicate work, and exceptional casting.


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Reviewed by: Theatreview

Date: 6th November, 2012

Reviewer: Gail Pittaway


TOUCHING AND UPLIFTING

David Lindsay-Abaire's Pulitzer Prize winning play brilliantly depicts a family group still in a state of crisis well after the traumatic events of the loss of a loved one.

A married couple, Howie and Becca, have grieved in such different ways over the accidental death of their very young son that they have become estranged from each other. Becca's grief imprisons her in ways that even her mother and sister consider odd; she does not weep but goes through motions in a meaningless orbit of chores and cannot break through the drone-like horror of her sadness.

This is not an easy play to watch and an even more difficult one to stage, yet the movement through the labyrinth of loss is ultimately inspiring.
 

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Latest Articles - Dracula


Rat joins horror classic on stage - Hamilton News, August 31st 2012

Bloody good show - Waikato Times, August 23 2012

Drama groups mix it up for Dracula - Hamilton Press, August 22 2012

A play with bite - Waikato Times, August 9 2012

ABOUT US

The metaphor of Carving in Ice evokes the transience of theatre. Ice sculptures are crafted by artisans whose sculptures last only for a short while, then melt and disappear. Theatre too is ephemeral in its nature; once the season is completed, the existence of the play, the shapes, sounds, movement in space, the light on actors’ skin disappear from view – but as with ice sculptures the traces of the experience continue to live on in the minds of those who were present.

CONTACT US

Email:
info@carvinginice.co.nz
director@carvinginice.co.nz
publicity@carvinginice.co.nz

 

 

ABOUT US

The metaphor of Carving in Ice evokes the transience of theatre. Ice sculptures are crafted by artisans whose sculptures last only for a short while, then melt and disappear. Theatre too is ephemeral in its nature; once the season is completed, the existence of the play, the shapes, sounds, movement in space, the light on actors’ skin disappear from view – but as with ice sculptures the traces of the experience continue to live on in the minds of those who were present.

CONTACT US

Email:
info@carvinginice.co.nz
director@carvinginice.co.nz
director@carvinginice.co.nz