Marmalade: Sweet, Sour, Sticky

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Marmalade: Sweet, Sour, Sticky - three short NZ plays

directed by Gaye Poole

June 26th - 28th, 2008


Do You Speak English? by Gary Langford
Using only English this short play convinces us that Gina – fresh faced from Italy – and Mark are mutually unintelligible. A playful exercise in non-verbal (mis)understandings.
 


Banging Cymbal, Clanging Gong by Jo Randerson
A direct, delicate, funny tale of resistance and forbearance in a world that anaesthetises us from pain and from the pleasure of letting instinct rule the heart.
 

The Joss Adams Show by Alma De Groen
A young mother is bewildered and adrift in postnatal depression; family and the medical profession are no help. Darkly humorous and absurd, their piece shows the way the media encourages the public to see stories like Joss’s as morbidly sensationalised entertainment.

 

Cast


Do you Speak English

Mark: Scot Hall
Gina: Antonia Lema Trevino


Banging Cymbal, Clanging Gong

Arianne Zilberberg


The Joss Adams Show

Joss: Keagan Fransch
Neil: Stuart Dunn
Muriel: Sara Young
Ken: David Lumsden
Doctor: Clive Lamdin
TV interviewer: Scot Hall
Nurse: Antonia Lema Trevino

 

View Cast Biographies



Creative Team

Director: Gaye Poole
Lighting: Alec Forbes
Sound: Charlie Joramo

 

A big thanks to our sponsors:
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ABOUT US

The metaphor of Carving in Ice evokes the transience of theatre. Ice sculptures are crafted by artisans whose sculptures last only for a short while, then melt and disappear. Theatre too is ephemeral in its nature; once the season is completed, the existence of the play, the shapes, sounds, movement in space, the light on actors’ skin disappear from view – but as with ice sculptures the traces of the experience continue to live on in the minds of those who were present.

CONTACT US

Email:
info@carvinginice.co.nz
director@carvinginice.co.nz
publicity@carvinginice.co.nz

 

 

ABOUT US

The metaphor of Carving in Ice evokes the transience of theatre. Ice sculptures are crafted by artisans whose sculptures last only for a short while, then melt and disappear. Theatre too is ephemeral in its nature; once the season is completed, the existence of the play, the shapes, sounds, movement in space, the light on actors’ skin disappear from view – but as with ice sculptures the traces of the experience continue to live on in the minds of those who were present.

CONTACT US

Email:
info@carvinginice.co.nz
director@carvinginice.co.nz
director@carvinginice.co.nz